Baghdad Archaeological Museum

Cosponsored by Penn's
Middle East Center
.


Loomba footage
Event Footage


Image: Baghdad Archaeological Museum; courtesy of C. Brian Rose

Penn Humanities Forum on Violence, 2013-2014 Forum on Violence Wednesday, 4 December, 2013 5:00–6:30 pm
Rainey Auditorium, Penn Museum, 3260 South Street

Past Imperfect: Archaeology and War in
Iraq and Afghanistan


C. Brian Rose
James B. Pritchard Professor of Archaeology
University of Pennsylvania

The looting of art and antiquities during times of war is as old as warfare itself. What's different about more recent efforts to protect cultural artifacts? C. Brian Rose, Professor of Classical Archaeology at Penn and past president of the Archaeological Institute of America, shares his work preserving museums, libraries, and ancient sites in Iraq and Afghanistan. He also discusses the cultural heritage training program he developed for U.S. troops deploying to the Middle East.

C. Brian Rose is James B. Pritchard Professor of Archaeology and Curator-in-Charge of the Mediterranean Section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. He also holds joint appointments in Classical Studies and History of Art at Penn. Since 1988 he has been head of Post-Bronze Age excavations at Troy, and since 2006 has been co-director of the Gordion Excavations. He is also English language editor of Studia Troica, the annual journal of the Troy excavations. His new survey project in the Granicus River Valley focuses on recording and mapping the Graeco-Persian tombs that dominate the area.

His research has also concentrated on the political and artistic relation between Rome and the provinces (Dynastic Commemoration and Imperial Portraiture in the Julio-Claudian Period, Cambridge University Press, 1997). He is vice president of the American Research Institute in Turkey, a past president of the Archaeological Institute of America, and a trustee of the American Academy in Rome.

He is currently finishing the final publication of the architecture and architectural decoration of the Roman houses at Troy and is writing a synthetic overview of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Excavations at Troy during the last eighteen years.

After receiving his B.A. in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology from Haverford College, Dr. Rose continued his education in art history and archaeology at Columbia University, where he earned an M.A., M. Phil, and Ph.D. Before joining Penn in 2005, he taught at the University of Cincinnati as the Cedric G. Boulter Professor of Classical Archaeology. A frequent lecturer in North America, Europe and Turkey, Prof. Rose is also the author or editor of numerous scholarly articles, books, and reviews.